Category Archives: Uncategorized

Tips for Living Openly: Put a License on it!

This is the second in a series of monthly posts about ways that those of us working in libraries can support open access (OA) to research.  This month’s tip is to assign Creative Commons licenses to your research and teaching resources. ______________________________________________________________________________________ Whether you want to publish your research in an open access journal or […]
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Pathways to OA Forum Seeks Transformations in Open Access

If today, libraries recommitted a sizable portion of their collections budgets to supporting open access, what impact would it have? What new licensing and other strategies can hasten the progress of open access publishing? These questions guided the recent Choosing Pathways to Open Access (#CP2OA18) forum at the University of California Berkeley, October 16-17. Guided […]
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Elsevier: Friend or Foe?

A purposefully provocative piece on Elsevier saving libraries money through Big Deals was recently published in the Scholarly Kitchen blog. Esposito (2018) argues that libraries should continue to negotiate pricing, but must realise the cost savings from purchasing from large publishers like Elsevier. The author describes the relationship between libraries and Elsevier as a “win-win”. […]
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ABC Copyright 2018

Missed out on Harvard’s CopyrightX course this year? Want to learn more about current Canadian copyright issues and initiatives? ABC Copyright 2018 takes place 31 May to 1 June in downtown Vancouver, hosted by Simon Fraser University and University of British Columbia. This conference is relevant and applicable to anyone working in libraries, higher education […]
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New OA eBook: Library as Publisher

Looking for some inspiring reading over the break? Sarah Lippincott’s new publication, Library as Publisher: New Models of Scholarly Communication for a New Era, is available as an open access ebook through the Charleston Briefings Series. From the blurb: Why are so many libraries going into the publishing business at a time when scholarly publishing is […]
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Canadian Scholarly Communications Community of Practice

About a year and a half ago, three Canadian librarians working on scholarly communications issues decided to start an online community to share information, advice and support around this kind of work. The Canadian Schol Comms Community of Practice has since grown into an active and lively group, with members from across the country representing […]
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Non-Profit Alternative to Researchgate

Inside Higher Ed reported on a new initiative known as Scholarly Hub.  It is being developed as a non-profit alternative to scholarly sites like ResearchGate and Academia.edu due to concerns that commercial sites are subject to buyouts by publishers. The site is now undergoing fundraising but the ultimate goal is to be sustainable by charging an […]
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Is Open Access Discoverable?

Kent Anderson’s post Detours and Diversions – Do Open Access Publishers Face New Barriers? is worth a read.    It discusses how clickbait, paid advertising, algorithms and misinformation is making it hard for credible Open Access content to become noticed.  Gone are the good old days when simply making content freely available meant it was more […]
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Springer Nature Agrees to Censorship of Publications in China

Several news outlets including the Financial Times, New York Times and Washington Post have reported that Springer Nature has acceded to China’s demands to censor controversial material in its publications. Content referring to Tiananmen Square, Taiwan and the Cultural Revolution cannot be found when doing a search of their publications in China. Springer Nature has […]
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